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"I always get worried when people asked me to read their scripts and 'tell me what you really think of it.' So I read it and tell them. And they get furious."
Tom Stempel
creativescreenwriting.com/us147/
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Wit, wisdom, and spot-on analysis of the latest releases!
Tom Stempel casts his eye over Genius, Finding Dory, Central Intelligence, The Shallows, and Our Kind of Traitor.
creativescreenwriting.com/us147/
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"One of the toughest things to do is to write a pilot that feels like it comes to a satisfying ending but yet leaves us wanting more."
Daniel P. Calvisi
creativescreenwriting.com/writing-for-television/
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"Why do people go to the cinema? The search for entertainment? The need for a kind of drug? All over the world there are, indeed, entertainment firms and organizations which exploit cinema and television and spectacles of many other kinds. Our starting point, however, should not be there, but in the essential principles of cinema, which have to do with the human need to master and know the world."
Andrei Tarkovsky
creativescreenwriting.com/plants-payoffs/
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"This question is one that I get a lot, which is, 'How much should you have defined of the character arcs ahead of time?' I think it’s best if you have a couple of full arcs in your pilot for a couple characters, at the least your protagonist. And then you should have an idea of your protagonist’s arc in the first season. Beyond that, it’s really up to you.
"It’s great, if you’re in a meeting, to say, 'I have the first four seasons arced out.' In the first season of Mad Men, the only person’s who’s going to find out that Don Draper is Dick Whitman is Pete Campbell, for example. And, Don’s wife will find out about his affair by the end of the season. Then in the second season, he’s going to have a new mistress, and something else is going to happen. Then in the third season, he’ll have a new mistress, and so on.
"So, it’s good to have that in mind, but you don’t have to have a complete outline of the basic arcs of every episode for the first season, second season, third season, et cetera. Make sure the pilot is ironclad, and make sure you have some ideas of where you’re going to go, but you don’t have to have every single episode mapped out.
"In fact, they don’t want you to have every episode broken down, like in a treatment or mini-bible, where you often give ideas for episodes in the first season. They don’t want you to have ideas for fifteen episodes, because they want to be able to develop with you. They want to be able to have some input, and bring in a director and other writers, and they want you to be open to directions for the series."
Daniel P. Calvisi on Writing for Television
creativescreenwriting.com/writing-for-television/
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