Craft

the theory and practise of screenwriting

 Art Holcomb

The Most Common Mistake in Spec Scripts

The Most Common Mistake in Spec Scripts

Four steps to coming up with a great script concept.

By Art Holcomb. “Most aspiring screenwriters simply don’t spend enough time choosing their concept. It’s by far the most common mistake I see in spec scripts. The writer has lost the race right from the gate. Months — sometimes years — are lost trying to elevate a film idea that by its nature probably had […]

 Dennis MaGee Fallon

Formulaic is Good!

Formulaic is Good!

Screenwriting guru Michael Hauge on the balancing act all commercial screenwriters must perform.

By Dennis MaGee Fallon Films follow patterns. TV shows have arcs. Narratives have structure. No matter the medium, stories seem to repeat the same beats, framework and through lines. Anyone who’s read a screenwriting book or taken a class or even seen a few movies can say, whether from study or intuition, that “I’ve seen […]

 Carla Iacovetti

To Flashback or Not to Flashback, That is the Question

To Flashback or Not to Flashback, That is the Question

David Trottier on The Use of Flashbacks.

By Carla Iacovetti. “About 95% of the flashbacks in unsold scripts don’t work. In first-time scripts, usually a flashback is used as a crutch; a cheap way to introduce exposition.” – David Trottier. David Trottier has sold or optioned ten screenplays (three produced). As an award-winning teacher and in-demand script consultant, David has helped hundreds of […]

 Michael Welles Schock

The Humility Arc

The Humility Arc

How fairy tale morality leads to a near-universal rule of screenwriting.

“I can’t beat him… I’ve been out there walking around, thinking. I mean, who am I kidding? I’m not even in the guy’s league.” – Rocky “I don’t want to know who I am anymore. I don’t care. Everything I’ve found out I want to forget.” – The Bourne Identity “I killed her, Red. I […]

 Jennie E. Park

Jeffrey Kitchen on Screenwriting, Part I

Jeffrey Kitchen on Screenwriting, Part I

In the first of a two part interview, Jeffrey Kitchen begins an overview of his screenwriting tools and techniques, including Dilemma, Crisis, Decision, Action and Resolution, the 36 Dramatic Situations, the Enneagram, and Research and Brainstorming.

By Jennie E. Park. Jeffrey Kitchen began studying dramatic writing with Irving Fiske before venturing into screenwriting. Based on the techniques in his book, Writing a Great Movie: Key Tools for Successful Screenwriting, he has provided workshops and private consultations on writing for film and television for twenty years.  In this two-part interview he provides […]

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